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Fireweed

Fireweed

An erect summer annual with alternate, lanceolate leaves that have toothed margins. Fireweed is primarily a weed of pastures, abandoned fields, and some agronomic crops. Its leaves are elliptic to lanceolate in outline, approximately 2 to 8 inches long, and 1/2 to 1/2 inches wide. Their stems are erect, solid, and usually without hairs (though occasionally slightly hairy). Stems range from 1 1/3 to 10 feet in height. This weed grows in the thatch layer which is located above the pre-emergence controls, rendering such controls powerless to stop its growth. Soil deficiencies indicated by this weed include low calcium and phosphorous, high potassium and iron, and excess thatch. Correcting these deficiencies is the most effective way to prevent this weed from growing.
Goosegrass

Goosegrass

Goosegrass is a prostrate-growing summer annual that grows in a clump, with the base of the leaves being distinctively white to silver. The leaves are often folded and may be smooth or have a few hairs. It features a strong, extensive root system and readily invades hard, compacted soils found in high-traffic areas.
Ground Ivy

Ground Ivy

Ground ivy is an aromatic, perennial, evergreen creeper of the mint family. It thrives in shady, moist areas and can quickly crowd out turfgrass. Ground ivy creeps along the soil surface and forms roots where the leaves join the stem.
Grub

Grub

Grubs are the most widespread and destructive pests of turf grasses in the cool -season and transition zones. They damage turf grasses by chewing off the roots near the soil surface. Early symptoms include gradual thinning, yellowing and wilting in spite of adequate soil moisture, as well as the appearance of scattered, irregular dead patches. Infested turf feels spongy underfoot because of the grubs having churned up the underlying soil.
Henbit

Henbit

Henbit is a sparsely hairy winter annual with greenish to purplish, tender, square stems. It has a fibrous root system and can grow to a height of 16 inches. Henbit’s distinctive flowers are reddish purple that bloom in the spring with the flowers arranged in whorls in the upper leaves. This broadleaf weed reproduces by seed that germinate in the fall or winter. It can quickly invade thin turf areas especially where there is good soil moisture. Shade also encourages growth and are not affected by mowing.
Japanese Beetle

Japanese Beetle

Japanese Beetles are small (1/2 inch) metallic green insects with bronze wing covers. The adults feed during the day on a wide variety of plants. They devour flowers, ripening fruit, and tender leaves with small veins, but only eat the tissue between the veins on tree leaves. The adults live for thirty to forty-five days and are most abundant in late July.
Japanese Clover

Japanese Clover

Lespedeza, also known as Japanese clover, is a very common summer weed that can easily choke out thing turf. It is a mat-forming, wiry stemmed, prostrate, freely branched summer annual with dark green trifoliate leaves with three oblong, smooth leaflets. Lespedeza has a semi-woody taproot and grows close to the ground making it difficult to cut with a mower.
Johnsongrass

Johnsongrass

Johnsongrass, a coarse and generally clumping grass, is one of the most troublesome of perennial grasses that rapidly produces colonies. This grass reproduces by seed and underground stems.
Lace Bug

Lace Bug

Lace Bugs are small (1/8 inch) insects. The adults have delicate, clear wings that they hold over their bodies. They commonly feed on azaleas, sucking the cell contents from the underside of the leaves, producing a mottling or speckling on the upper surface. There are many species of lace bugs. The most common is the (Stephanitis) on Azaleas and Rhododendrons.
Leaf Miner

Leaf Miner

A leaf miner is the larva of an insect that lives in and eats the leaf tissue of plants. They feed by creating shallow tunnels, or mines, in young leaves of citrus trees. The damage is unsightly, and if left untreated, can end up causing serious damage to a plant.
Leaf Spot

Leaf Spot

Leaf spot is a common descriptive term applied to a number of diseases affecting the foliage of ornamentals and shade trees. The majority of leaf spots are caused by fungi, but some are caused by bacteria. Leaf spot may result in some defoliation of a plant.
Mole

Mole

Moles are small grey to black mammals with fine velvety fur. They have hairless snouts and inconspicuous eyes and ears. Their eyesight is poor but they have superior senses of smell, touch and hearing. Their front feet are much larger than their hind feet and have long trowel-like claws used for tunneling in the ground. Moles live in burrows made up of many interconnecting runways that are usually about 6-8 inches underground.
Oxalis

Oxalis

Oxalis is an upright perennial with hairy stems. It has alternating leaves with heart-shaped lobes and bright yellow flowers with five petals. Its presence indicates very low calcium, high magnesium, and low humus.
Powdery Mildew

Powdery Mildew

Powdery mildew is probably the most familiar plant disease. Unlike most other fungus diseases of plants, it grows on the outside of leaves, forming a gray or white “powder”. Also, unlike other fungus diseases, which only infect wet leaves, powdery mildew invades dry leaves as well.
Purple Nutsedge

Purple Nutsedge

Purple Nutsedge is a rapidly spreading perennial with flat leaves that are usually shorter than the flowering stem. They reproduce primarily by tubers. There is no pre-emergent control for nutsedge. Its presence indicates very low calcium, high potassium, high magnesium, low humus, low bacterial count and anaerobic soils. Yellow Nutsedge is a rapidly spreading perennial with flat leaves that are usually shorter than the flowering stem. They reproduce primarily by tubers. There is no pre-emergent control for nutsedge. Its presence indicates very low calcium, high potassium, high magnesium, low humus, low bacterial count and anaerobic soils.

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Huntsville, AL   •   Birmingham, AL